Best Sandwiches In The U.S.

Americans may never get over their obsession with amazing hamburgers, but they’ve certainly made room for an equally delicious meal between bread: the artisanal sandwich. Here, Food & Wine names the best sandwiches in the U.S.

Muff-a-Lotta, Bayou Bakery – Arlington, VA

Chef-partner and New Orleans native David Guas’s menu spells muffaletta phonetically according to the Yat pronunciation (an English dialect unique to NOLA).

His recipe also stays true to his roots with a briny garlic-and-oregano-laced olive salad, salami, mortadella, smoked ham and aged provolone in a sesame-seed-studded toasted Italian roll.

Oregon Albacore Tuna Melt – Bunk Sandwiches, Portland, OR

At Bunk, co-chefs Tommy Habetz and Nick Wood reinvent iconic American foods. That means transforming biscuits and gravy into a sandwich filled with braised rabbit leg, or preparing luscious melts, like this version packed with locally canned albacore and finished with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and Tillamook cheddar.

Chopped Coffee-Cured Beef Brisket – Smoke, Dallas

Chef-owner and F&W People’s Best New Chef 2012 Tim Byres slow-cooks the meat for this coffee-inflected brisket sandwich in the restaurant’s backyard wood-burning smokehouse.

De-Constructed Cuban – Bin No. 18, Miami

Shredded pork and gooey triple-cream cheese fill a tomato-garlic-and-olive-oil-rubbed ciabatta roll in Bin No. 18’s loose interpretation of the traditional Cuban sandwich. Although it’s served with a fig-and-port-wine reduction, customers usually skip the accompaniment and reach for the hot sauce Sriracha.Bin_no

Fried Chicken Sandwich – Bakesale Betty, Oakland, CA

These delicious sandwiches, filled with crispy buttermilk-soaked, cayenne pepper-spiced fried chicken, sell out fast. Each of Bakesale Betty’s two Bay Area locations is only open for three hours a day–even less if there aren’t enough sweet torpedo rolls to keep making sandwiches.

Smoked Meat – Mile End, Brooklyn 

To create smoked meat–NYC pastrami’s fattier, spicier Canadian cousin–for the sandwiches at his Montreal-style Jewish deli in Boerum Hill, chef-owner Noah Bernamoff cures Pat LaFrieda-sourced, prime-Angus-certified beef brisket in a dry rub of salt, black pepper, spices and garlic before oak-smoking and steaming the meat for several hours.

Reuben – Zingerman’s Ann Arbor, MI

Oprah Winfrey is a noted fan of this grocery-store-turned-Jewish-deli’s famed Reuben–and with good reason. The sandwiches are made with locally sourced corned beef, Emmentaler Swiss cheese, house-made Russian dressing and house-made rye bread. Zingerman’s shop also offers mail-order sandwich kits for out-of-state Reuben cravings.

Courtesy: HuffPost

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Global Cuisine: Edition 9

If you’re currently in an interracial/interethnic relationship, or you are planning on becoming KolorBlind, one of the issues you’ll face in your relationship is the adaptation to different cuisines. This is particularly true, if your significant other is from a different culture/nationality. Part of being KolorBlind is keeping an open mind to different cultures, looks and languages.

Once you can wrap your mind around the fact that you too would be considered ‘different’ or ‘weird’ in their country/culture, I think you’ll begin to accept your partner’s culture a lot more. One of the first steps to stepping across the line, is learning a new language or in this case acclimating yourself to a new dish.

If you and your significant other are not able to agree on whose dish should be prepared, then consider incorporating some of these dishes into your weekly menu.

CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICA

Central America – Asaltado Vegetariano (Stir-Fried Vegetable Sandwich)

The mayonnaise-based sauce in this hearty vegetable and cheese sandwich from Pasquale Hermanos, chef Gastón Acurio‘s chain of sandwich shops based in Lima, Peru, is flavored with ground fresh rocoto, a spicy South American chile.

This recipe first appeared in our April 2011 special Sandwich Issue with the article Chef’s Special. Click here for the recipe. Asaltado Vegetariano

South America – Pão de Queijo

If you can’t find sour tapioca starch to make this Brazilian cheese bread, sweet tapioca starch will yield equally delicious results. This recipe appeared in our March 2011 issue as a part of Dorothy Irwin’s profile on cassava, Taking Root. Click here for the recipe. Pao De Queijo

NORTH AMERICA

USA – Mango Bread

This loaf cake recipe can be updated with the changing seasons: Substitute dates for mango when they aren’t available. This recipe first appeared in our Jan/Feb 2013 issue along with Victoria Pesce Elliott’s article Parcel-Post Food Gifts. Click here for the recipe. Mango Bread

USA – Hoppin’ John Soup

This humble dish of black-eyed peas and rice makes good use of leftover ham scraps. Click here for the recipe. Hoppin John soup

Mexico – Sopa de Tortilla (Tortilla Soup)

This inventive take on tortilla soup from celebrated Mexican chef Martha Ortiz is garnished with silky goat cheese and crispy pork rinds. This recipe first appeared in our Jan/Feb 2013 issue along with Nicholas Gill’s article Dulce Patria. Click here for the recipe. Sopa de Tortilla

EUROPE

Spain – Iberico Pork Tenderloin with Charred Red Pepper Sauce

An easy charred red pepper sauce inspired by romesco, a popular Spanish sauce, is the perfect accompaniment to seared or grilled meats, such as Iberico pork tenderloin. Iberico pork tenderloin is best cooked to a rosy pink medium-rare with the 3/2/1 approach: Sear for 3 minutes on one side, 2 minutes on the other, and finish for 1 minute in the oven. Click here for the recipe. Iberico Pork Tenderloin with Charred Red Pepper

France – Deep-Fried Cardoons

Much-loved in Italy and France, fried cardoons are among author Mireille Johnston‘s favorite dishes. Click here for the recipe. deep fried cardoons

ASIA

Japan – Spicy Shoyu Ramen

If you don’t (or can’t) eat spicy food like myself, don’t panic yet. This amount of spiciness is “endurable” for people who cannot tolerable spicy food, even me. If you prefer no spicy taste at all for yourself or young children, you can use regular chili bean paste (doubanjiang) and not spicy chili bean paste (la doubanjiang).

Of course, if you like it more spicy, please increase the amount based on your personal preference. Click here for the recipe. Spicy Shoyu Ramen

Taiwan – Hong Shao Niu Rou Mian (Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup)

The recipe for this soup is based on one from Taipei’s Yong Kang Beef Noodle shop. Click here for the recipe. Hong Shao Niu Rou Mian

Thailand – Thai Red Curry with Roasted Duck

For the best results when you’re making this sweet and spicy dish, ask the counter person at your local Chinese market to cut the roasted duck into pieces. We recommend using the Mae Ploy brand of canned coconut milk; its high fat content makes for a rich and luxurious curry. Click here for the recipe.Thai Red Curry with Roasted Duck

North India – Rajma (Indian Kidney Bean Masala Stew)

The beans in this classic Punjabi dish can be cooked without a pressure cooker, but allow for an extra hour of cooking time. Serve with flatbread or rice. This recipe first appeared in our Jan/Feb 2013 issue along with Nidhi Chaudhry’s article Pressure Cooker. Click here for the recipe. Rajma Kidney Bean Masala Stew

CARIBBEAN

Haiti – Soup Joumou

This savory pumpkin soup is typically served in Haiti on January 1, the anniversary of Haiti’s liberation from France. It is said that the soup was once a delicacy reserved for white masters but forbidden to the slaves who cooked it.

After Independence, Haitians took to eating it to celebrate the world’s first and only successful slave revolution resulting in an independent nation. Click here for the recipe. Soup Joumou

Jamaica – Curried Chicken

Bathed in fragrant curry- and ginger-infused coconut milk, this stew is a popular breakfast dish at Kingston cafés. This recipe first appeared in our November 2011 issue along with Betsy Andrews’s story Good Morning, Jamaica. Click here for the recipe. Curried Chicken

Until the next time we explore food from around the world, eat, pray and love.

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20 Bacon Recipes

Smoky, savory, crunchy bacon is impossible to resist in these 20 bacon-perfect recipes.

Fingerling Potatoes with Bacon

The secret to this simple dish is to use the best-possible bacon. Click here for the recipe. Fingerling Potatoes with Bacon

Spinach Salad with Hot Bacon Dressing

The ancestor of this dish is German potato salad. During the 19th century (and perhaps before), German-Americans used the flavorful dressing to coat dandelion greens. In the States, the bitter greens were eventually supplanted by spinach. Click here for the recipe. 

Bacon-and-Cheese Deviled Eggs

SAVEUR kitchen assistant Max Iattoni gave us the recipe for these eggs, which he based on his favorite breakfast sandwich. Click here for the recipe. 

Gamberi al Rosmarino (Shrimp with Pancetta and Rosemary)

Serve these garlicky shrimp with lots of crusty bread. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe.

Tofu Wanzi (Fried Tofu and Bacon Fritters)

China meets the American South in these tofu, bacon, and scallion fritters from Saveur contributor Mei Chin. For three dipping sauces to serve with them, see Green Goddess SauceRoasted Garlic Chipotle Mayonnaise and Soy Chili Sauce. This recipe first appeared in the 2012 SAVEUR 100, with the article Tofu Wanzi. Click here for the recipe. 

Onion and Bacon Tart

The custardy batter for this dish, a cousin of Yorkshire pudding, puffs like an enormous popover in the oven. This recipe first appeared in our November 2011 issue along with Dana Bowen’s story Roots of Flavor. Click here for the recipe. Onion and bacon tart

Bacon-Wrapped Smoked Trout With Tarragon

This trout dish turns smoky and succulent in a stove-top smoker. This recipe first appeared in our June/July 2011 BBQ issue along with our story Classic ‘Cues. Click here for the recipe.

Speķa Pīrāgi (Bacon Turnovers)

These small bacon and onion pies are a staple of Latvian festive tables. We prefer double-smoked bacon, but any thick-cut bacon will do. This recipe first appeared in our May 2011 issue, with the article Riga Revisited. Click here for the recipe. 

Maple-Bacon Popcorn

Smoky bacon, sweet maple, and a kick of black pepper make for an entirely addictive bowl of popcorn. Click here for the recipe. 

Bacon-Wrapped Scallions

Butcher shops all across Sicily sell these bacon-wrapped scallions called Cipollate con Pancetta. This recipe appeared in our March 2011 issue as a part of our special feature, Soul of Sicily. Click here for the recipe. 

Baked Oysters with Bacon and Spinach

Chef Frank Stitt of Highlands Bar and Grill in Birmingham, Alabama, shared this recipe for a lighter twist on classic oysters Rockefeller. Click here for the recipe. 

Parsley and Pancetta Salad

Crisp, salty pancetta, earthy parsley, and lemon combine beautifully in this salad from Houston’s Dolce Vita restaurant. Click here for the recipe. 

Pea Shoots with Shrimp, Bacon, and Chives

Tender pea shoots are natural partners for rich-tasting shrimp and bacon. Click here for the recipe. 

Green Beans with Pancetta and Mint

This green bean dish is mildly creamy, thanks to a quick blanching in milk, which also sweetens the beans slightly. A garnish of toasted chopped hazelnuts adds a lovely nutty crunch.

This recipe appeared with Irene Sax’s piece “Small Wonders” (November 2008), a tribute to Thanksgiving side dishes—though we think it works well anytime of year. Click here for the recipe. 

Bacon-Wrapped Sardines

King Oscar sardines work nicely in this preparation, which is based on a recipe in La Cuisine (Leon Amill, 1969) by Raymond Oliver. Click here for the recipe. 

Bacon-fried Chicken with Gravy

After breakfast, why throw away the bacon grease when it’s great for cooking french fries, onion rings, and, of course, fried chicken? It’s like the food was kissed by a salty smoke flavor.

This recipe, from James Beard’s American Cookery by James Beard (Little, Brown and Company, 1972), was one Beard’s father used. Click here for the recipe. 

Frisée Salad with Poached Eggs and Bacon

Slivers of bacon create a pleasing taste and textural contrast in this classic French bistro salad. Click here for the recipe. 

Bacon Cheeseburger

There are many ways to make a bacon cheeseburger but this one, from former SAVEUR editor Colman Andrews, is one of our favorites. Tamari, which is aged soy sauce without added wheat, is available in Asian markets and many supermarkets.

Lightly crusty, oval Portuguese rolls are sold mostly on the East Coast; if they’re unavailable, other rolls may be substituted. Click here for the recipe. 

Breakfast Trout with Bacon

The wilderness of northern Maine offers plenty of outdoor activities, among them trout fishing. Rising early is imperative, but the rewards are worth it: the thrill of the catch, and a hearty breakfast like this one. Click here for the recipe.

Jalapeño Bacon Corn Bread Muffins

This Southwestern-style recipe is a perennial favorite at the National Cornbread Festival. Click here for the recipe. bacon jalapeno cornbread

Credit: Saveur

Italian Small Bites

As a snack or an appetizer with wine, there’s nothing quite as light, restorative, and fun as a sampling of Italian small bites. Mix and match these recipes — plates of grilled polenta, stuffed zucchini and cherry peppers, sweet and sour sardines, and more — serving one or two for a casual get-together with a friend, or a whole spread for a crowd.

Montasio Cheese Crisps

Lidia Bastianich, who owns New York’s Felidia and operates a restaurant, called Frico, with her son, grew up eating this irresistible fried-cheese snack in her hometown of Pula, Croatia (once part of Italy).

Frico may be stuffed with a variety of fillings. When making this simple version, we added a little flour to help the frico hold its shape. Click here for the recipe. 

Cozze al Pomodoro (Stuffed Mussels)

Thyme and white wine bring out the sweet flavor of mussels in these popular cicheti. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story ‘Good and Plenty’. Click here for the recipe. 

Gamberi al Rosmarino (Shrimp with Pancetta and Rosemary)

Serve these garlicky shrimp with lots of crusty bread. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe. 

Tramezzini (Venetian Tea Sandwiches)

Our favorite fillings for Venetian tea sandwiches are asparagus and eggs, tuna and olives, and arugula with cured beef. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe. 

Sarde in Saor (Sweet and Sour Sardines)

These sumptuous cicheti are traditionally made with fried sardines, but they’re just as delicious when the fish are broiled. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe. 

Polpette (Meat Croquettes)

Made with ground veal and potatoes, these are a classic Venetian cicheti. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe. 

Fondi di Carciofi (Bacon-Wrapped Artichokes)

These artichoke hearts wrapped in bacon were inspired by cicheti served at Hosteria Vite Rossa in Venice’s Mestre area. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe.

Cappesante al Forno (Baked Scallops with Parmesan)

Sea scallops on the half shell are seasoned with herbs and a dusting of Parmesan in this classic Venetian chicheti. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe. 

Baccalà Mantecato (Grilled Polenta with Dried Cod Mousse)

This creamy codfish mousse is delicious served with char-grilled squares of polenta. This recipe first appeared in our March 2012 issue, with Dana Bowen’s story Good and Plenty. Click here for the recipe. 

Marinated Sardine Crostini with Salsa Verde and Fennel

Chef Tony Mantuano, of Chicago’s Spiaggia, combines the tangy flavors of tarragon and chive salsa verde with a zesty lemon and fennel salad in this marinated sardine crostini. Click here for the recipe. 

Eggplant Caponata

This classic sweet and sour eggplant dish is rich and sweetened with caramelized onions and raisins. This recipe appeared in our March 2011 issue as a part of our special feature, Soul of Sicily. Click here for the recipe. 

Mortadella Smear

Father-and-son team Jimmy Bannos Sr. and Jr. of Chicago’s Purple Pig restaurant purée mortadella, an Italian bologna, and slather it on toast with balsamic vinegar and pistachios, a combination that is devastatingly addictive. Click here for the recipe.  Mortadella Smears

Fritto Misto (Fried Squid, Fish and Shrimp)

David Pasternack, the chef at the New York City restaurant Esca, uses a combination of olive oil and canola oil to make this classic Italian dish. Click here for the recipe. 

Sweet and Sour Onions (Cipolline in Agrodolce)

This dish is beloved in Rome, where it pairs naturally with roasted meats like porchetta. Click here for the recipe. cipolline in agrodolce

Angeli Caffe’s Focaccia

Evan Kleiman, the chef and owner of Angeli Caffe (see Family Style) in Los Angeles, gave us this recipe for Italian flat bread, which she tops with ‘nduja, a spreadable Italian cured meat.

You can buy ‘nduja from the San Francisco-based pork store, Boccalone. Click here for the recipe.

Chicken Liver Crostini

A version of this recipe appears in Flavors of Tuscany (Broadway Books, 1998) by Nancy Harmon Jenkins. Click here for the recipe. 

Italian Stuffed Clams

Foriana sauce makes a great alternative for the bread crumb stuffing often used on baked or broiled clams. Click here for the recipe. 

Shrimp with Spicy Garlic and Tomato Sauce

Vigliacca can mean scoundrel which in the case of a sauce means that it’s spiced with chile peppers. This concoction has been served at Trattoria Garga since their 1979 opening.

The owners like it atop everything from pasta to meat loaf. Click here for the recipe. 

Stuffed and Fried Squash Blossoms

Zucchini and other squash blossoms are fried all over Italy—stuffed or not—but this recipe came from a restaurant in Castel Gandolfo, near Rome. Click here for the recipe. 

Restaurant Spotlight: NYC SoHo’s Comodo

Cómodo is a Latin American restaurant Worth Kitchen supper-clubbers Felipe and Tamy Donnelly that opened in the former Salt space in Soho. The low-key, airy space, coupled with the restaurant’s tucked-away Soho location, conjures a simple, Old World place away from the city bustle.

Located in the historic SoHo neighborhood (“SOuth of Houston“), which is bounded by Houston Street to the north and Canal Street to the south, entrées are served in a relaxed setting that you, your friends, and your family are sure to enjoy.

Whether you are in the mood to indulge in something new or just want to enjoy some old favorites, you can be sure that Comodo’s inventive menu and attentive service will leave you truly satisfied.

What is SoHo Comodo?

SoHo Comodo is a new technology-driven restaurant in New York City that has implemented what it calls an Instagram menu, directing patrons to pictures of food posted on the popular photo-sharing site to help them decide what to order.

It all started when three-week old Latin-American restaurant Comodo, located in Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood, noticed guests were repeatedly snapping pictures of their entrees and uploading them to Instagram, it decided to capitalize on the trend.

Who runs SoHo Comodo?

Felipe and Tamy DonnellyHusband/wife team Felipe and Tamy Donnelly chronicled their journey to Comodo by running the taste-kicthen ‘Worth Kitchen’ for a year before embarking on their new initiative SoHo Comodo.

Felipe Donnelly quit his job in advertising last year to do catering and run Worth (now at the City Grit space) full-time. Menu-wise, Donnelly had plans to use local ingredients, but wanted “every dish to have a Latin American flavor,” reflecting the couple’s Colombian and Mexican upbringings.

As it happens, Worth has served as a useful laboratory for testing dishes on real eaters. Donnelly says he’s cooked a different menu at each month’s dinner and asked for diner feedback. By far the most popular dish (definitely going on Cómodo’s menu) has been lamb sliders served on pão de queijo (Brazilian cheese bread) buns.

What type of food can I expect?

It promises Donnelly’s lamb sliders served on pão de queijo (Brazilian cheese bread), hibiscus and queso fresco spring rolls, escolar tiradito with uni and mint-yogurt vinaigrette; and coffee-rubbed cochinita over a rice cake.

But don’t take our word for it, check out some offerings from menu below to see for yourself.

Cod with parsnip aji pureeCod with parsnip aji puree, meyer lemons and asparagus comodoEscolar tiradito and uni with mint yogurt vinaigrette comodoEscolar tiradito and uni with mint yogurt vinaigrette comodoLamb chops with mint goat cheese pesto Lamb chops with mint goat cheese pesto comodoInfamous Lamb sliderslamb sliders comodoPeruvian styled corvina ceviche with citrus, peaches, cilantro and bocadilloPeruvian styled corvina ceviche with citrus, peaches, cilantro and bocadillo comodoRock Shrimp saladrock shrimp salad comodoScallops with chipotle and avocado sauce Scallops with chipotle and avocado sauce comodoSeared duck breast with “classico” sauce and quinoaSeared duck breast with ‘Classico’ sauce comodo

How can I contact them/make reservations?

You can make reservations using Open Table. This is a restaurant perfect for that special celebration. For those who ask where to take your dates, this NYC restaurant is the perfect spot.

If you are not from the New York area, make sure you visit the next time you’re in town.

“People love taking pictures of food when they go out, and we wanted to use what was organically happening on social media sites and turn it into a helpful and fun tool at the restaurant,” Comodo owner Felipe Donnelly told Mashable.

“ We’ve been encouraging guests to post pictures on Instagram to spread the word, and the feedback has been great. Everyone keeps telling us how smart and creative it is.”

Donnelly said it aims to help people decide what to order by searching the hashtag and seeing what others post. Waiters also point out the new initiative to patrons and ask them add their own pictures to the collection, along with reviews and feedback.

So if you have an Instagram account, make sure you search using #ComodoMenu. This hastag has been added it to the bottom of its real-life menu, encouraging guests to add, share and check out photos of food offered at the establishment.

Take a look at the YouTube clip below for more information:

Global Cuisine: Edition 8

If you’re currently in an interracial/interethnic relationship, or you are planning on becoming KolorBlind, one of the issues you’ll face in your relationship is the adaptation to different cuisines. This is particularly true, if your significant other is from a different culture/nationality.

Part of being KolorBlind is keeping an open mind to different cultures, looks and languages. Once you can wrap your mind around the fact that you too would be considered ‘different’ or ‘weird’ in their country/culture, I think you’ll begin to accept your partner’s culture a lot more.

One of the first steps to stepping across the line, is learning a new language or in this case acclimating yourself to a new dish. If you and your significant other are not able to agree on whose dish should be prepared, then consider incorporating some of these dishes into your weekly menu.

ASIA

India – Pudding

This warming cornmeal-thickened sugar pudding recipe comes to us from Ed Brown, chef-owner of Ed’s Chowder House in Manhattan. Click here for the recipe. Indian Pudding

Japan – Sage Tempura Shiitake Mushrooms

Earthy sage brings out the woodsy flavor of shiitake mushrooms in this simple fried appetizer. Click here for the recipe. shitake mushrooms

India – Milagu Rasam (Spicy Tomato and Tamarind Soup)

In South India, this spicy, fragrant soup is often served at the end of a meal. It is eaten, too, to soften the effects of fevers and colds. This recipe appeared in the iPad edition of our December 2012 issue along with Sushma Subramanian’s story Feed a Fever. Click here for the recipe. Milagu Rasam

AFRICA

Morocco – Mrouzia (Honey-Braised Lamb Shanks)

Lamb shanks are braised for hours in a sumptuous sauce of honey, almonds, and raisins in this centuries-old Moroccan dish served at the restaurant Mansouria. This recipe first appeared in our November 2012 issue along with Jay Cheshes’s story Couscous Royale. Click here for the recipe. Mrouzia honey braised lamb shanks

Algeria – Mahjouba (Crêpes)

These thick, flaky crêpes stuffed with a jammy tomato-based filling are a typical street snack in Algeria. This recipe first appeared in our November 2012 issue along with Jay Cheshes’s story Couscous Royale. Click here for the recipe. mahjouba algerian crepes

EUROPE

Germany – Laugenbrezel (Traditional German Pretzels)

At the Hofbräuhaus beer hall in Munich, these giant pretzels, which have a similar chew to bagels, are served with soft butter. This recipe first appeared in our December 2012 issue along with Todd Coleman’s story Bavarian Dream. Click here for the recipe. German Pretzel

Sweden – Heirloom Cookies

This recipe, from Amanda Hesser, co-founder of Food52.com, appeared in our 2012 Cookie Advent Calendar. Amanda says: “This is a pretty common cookie recipe—my mother made them with walnuts, and when she had them, black walnuts, which were insanely good.

They last for months and are hard to screw up—the two prerequisites for holiday cookies.” Click here for the recipe. Swedish Heirloom Cookies

Poland – Krusciki (Polish Bow-Tie Fritters)

Also referred to as angel wings, these sugar-dusted fritters are both crunchy and pillowy. They’re often served at Polish weddings and holidays. This recipe first appeared in our December 2012 issue along with Jennifer Walker’s story Holiday Parade. Click here for the recipe. Krusciki Polish bow Tie Fritters

Italy – Malfatti (Ricotta and Swiss Chard Dumplings)

Chef Anna Klinger of Al Di Là in Brooklyn, New York, flavors these dumplings with nutmeg. For the best results, drain the ricotta overnight and squeeze all the moisture out of the Swiss chard. Click here for the recipe. Malfatti

Greece – Saganaki Bites with Sun Dried Tomato Tapenade

Dipping the cheese cubes in water before coating with flour is essential; it helps the flour to adhere and prevents the cheese from leaking into the oil as it fries. Click here for the recipe. saganaki bites

Greece – Avgolemono (Greek Lemon Chicken Soup)

This flavorful Mediterranean classic, adapted from Diane Kochilas’s The Country Cooking of Greece(Chronicle 2012) can be made using orzo pasta instead of rice. This recipe appeared in the iPad edition of our December 2012 issue along with Sushma Subramanian’s story Feed a Fever. Click here for the recipe. Avgolemono

CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICA

Central America – Tapou (Fish, Green Banana, and Root Vegetable Soup)

Tender root vegetables and fried fish make this garlicky stew a satisfying meal. This recipe first appeared in our November 2012 issue along with Betsy Andrews’s story Cassava Nation. Click here for the recipe. Tapou fish soup

Cuba – Torticas de Morón

This recipe, from Gastrofotonomia blogger Manny Rodriguez, appeared in our 2012 Cookie Advent Calendar.

Manny says: “Torticas de Morón are a traditional shortbread cookie from the city of Morón in central Cuba, and I’ve never met a Cuban that doesn’t like them. I make my version with cream cheese and guava and a little sprinkle of sea salt on top that makes it very unauthentic, but yummy.” Click here for the recipe.

Torticas de Morón - Shortbread Cookie

Brazil – Brigadeiros (Brazilian Fudge Balls)

You can find many versions of brigadieros, but chocolate is the traditional flavor for these dense, chewy fudge balls rolled in sprinkles, a treasured treat in Brazil. This recipe first appeared in the 2012 SAVEUR 100, with the article Brigadeiros. Click here for the recipe. brigadeiros

NORTH AMERICA

USA – White Chocolate Bread Pudding with Bananas and Rum Sauce

This decadent take on an iconic New Orleans dessert, from Mat & Naddie’s Restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana, gilds the lily, pan-frying white chocolate-enriched bread pudding, and plating it with satiny caramel and brûléed bananas.

This recipe first appeared in our December 2012 issue along with Ben Mims’s story Beyond the Pale. Click here for the recipe. White chocolate bread pudding

USA – Truffled Macaroni and Cheese

The addition of truffle and truffle-infused oil heightens an already indulgent dish. To make this dish more wallet friendly, use jarred black truffles packed in water for the sauce and splurge on fresh for garnish. Click here for the recipe. Truffled Mac and Cheese

THE CARIBBEAN

Jamaica – Jerk Roast Turkey

A simple roast turkey is transformed into the thing of legend when slathered with a spicy, fragrant jerk sauce. Basting towards the end of roasting ensures a crisp, brown skin without over caramelizing the sugars. Click here for the recipe.  Jamaica Jerk Roast Turkey

St. Thomas – Boiled Fish with Onion Sauce and Fungi

Malanga, a tarolike root popular in St. Thomas, is sold in Caribbean markets. Click here for the recipe. Boiled Fish with Onion Sauce and Fungi

Until the next time we explore food from around the world, eat, pray and love.

Merry Xmas From KolorBlind Magazine!

Here’s our Christmas present to our readers: A Christmas dinner out of cake!

For millions of children, Christmas dinner means just one thing: the dreaded Brussels sprout. Wouldn’t it be nicer if the tiny offensive vegetables tasted of, say, cake? Which is precisely what Birmingham-based food artist Annabell de Vetten, 41, thought when she decided to craft a festive feast of turkey and all the trimmings entirely out of sponge cake, chocolate and buttercream icing.

Annabel, who created the masterpiece as part of an exhibition on display in London’s Imperial College, carved the meal entirely by hand in just a few hours, and used edible food paint to bring the piece to life.

Along with three other cake artists, Annabel showed off her skills and managed to pull off the Christmas dinner which went on display at Imperial on 13 December. Incredibly, British cake designer Annabel only turned her hand to cake art two years ago when she married her American husband Thom and needed a cake to celebrate the big day.

End result: ‘When I look back at how it all turned out, I’m really pleased and it’s actually better than I imagined’End result: 'When I look back at how it all turned out, I'm really pleased and it's actually better than I imagined'She painted everything from the sprouts to the tiny herbs on top of the roast turkey. For those with a sweet tooth, it’s the perfect opportunity to tuck into desert first as even the gravy and candles were made out of chocolate.Christmas cake? Annabel's spongecake dinner includes peas, Brussels sprouts, toast potatoes, carrots and pigs in blanketsTurkey and trimmings: Annabel painted everything from the sprouts to the tiny herbs on top of the roast turkey – even the gravy and candles were made out of chocolateTurkey and trimmings: Annabel painted everything from the sprouts to the tiny herbs on top of the roast turkey - even the gravy and candles were made out of chocolateThe two-tier white chocolate mud cake was a huge hit with her guests, and Annabel soon found herself with orders coming in from family and friends. She decided to put her skills into practice and set up her own business, Conjurer’s Kitchen, which she runs from her home in Kings Heath, Birmingham.

Annabel said: ‘The hardest part of it for me was getting the herbs to look like real herbs as I’d never done anything like that before. When I look back at how it all turned out, I’m really pleased and it’s actually better than I imagined.’

The idea behind the sweet dinner was that visitors to the exhibition would eat it – but in typically British fashion, people were too polite to touch the art, much less take great bites out of it.

Annabel said: ‘We took the dinner along to the exhibition for people to eat but to begin with everybody was a bit shy about trying tucking in. Once the first person tried a bit though, everybody else joined in and it was gone within 30 minutes.’

And just like other artists, Annabel worries about her work being damaged during delivery – especially if the delivery men are peckish.

She said: ‘It’s always a worry when it comes to delivering my work because you want to make sure it gets there in one piece. Myself and the other cake artists got really positive feedback from everybody who saw the dinner so it makes it all worthwhile.’

‘To be honest, even though I had to change the turkey about three times, the whole thing was really exciting from start to finish.’

Sweet feast: Along with three other cake artists, Annabel showed off her skills and managed to pull off the Christmas dinner which went on display at Imperial on 13 DecemberSweet feast: Along with three other cake artists, Annabel showed off her skills and managed to pull off the Christmas dinner which went on display at Imperial on 13 DecemberCan we eat it? Visitors to the exhibition in London were initially shy about scoffing Annabel’s art, but eventually everyone got stuck inCan we eat it? Visitors to the exhibition in London were initially shy about scoffing Annabel's art, but eventually everyone got stuck inAnd for my next trick: Annabel runs her own cake business, Conjurer’s Kitchen, from her home in Kings Heath, BirminghamAnd for my next trick: Annabel runs her own cake business, Conjurer's Kitchen, from her home in Kings Heath, BirminghamTuck in: Visitors to the exhibition in Imperial College using toothpicks to sample Annabel’s alternative Christmas dinnerTuck in: Visitors to the exhibition in Imperial College using toothpicks to sample Annabel's alternative Christmas dinnerAnnabel said: ‘Myself and the other cake artists got really positive feedback from everybody who saw the dinner so it makes it all worthwhile’Annabel said: 'Myself and the other cake artists got really positive feedback from everybody who saw the dinner so it makes it all worthwhile'

 

Global Cuisine Holiday Edition: 37 Impressive Christmas/Holiday Dishes

Celebrate the holidays with any one of these 34 impressive, satisfying roasts. From traditional pineapple-topped ham to roast lamb with rosemary or prosciutto-wrapped pork loin, you’re sure to find the perfect centerpiece for your dinner table.

England – Christmas Goose with Stuffing

This holiday goose is served with a rice and bread stuffing studded with bacon, Brussels sprouts, and chestnuts. Click here for the recipe. Christmas Goose with Stuffing

Puerto Rico – Coquito (Puerto Rican Eggnog)

Coconut and rum flavor this tropical eggnog. This recipe first appeared in our December 2011 issue along with Kathleen Squires’s story Island Holiday. Click here for the recipe. coquito

Canada – Tourtière (Québécois Meat Pie)

The recipe for this French Canadian classic came from saveur kitchen assistant and resident Canadian Anne-Marie White.

“This is my favorite kind of rustic home cooking,” she says, “and the apple cider and warming spices make it a perfect holiday dish.”Click here for the recipe.

Canadian Meat Pie

USA – Sara’s Roast Chicken with Sage and Garlic

This simple, elegant roast chicken is flavored with parsley, lemon, sage, and garlic. This simple but delicious roast chicken is based on a recipe in Olives and Oranges by Sara Jenkins and Mindy Fox. Click here for the recipe. Sara's roast chicken with sage and garlic

Germany – Sauerbraten (German Pot Roast)

It was in Cologne in 1963 that I finally solved the riddle of preparing sauerbraten. What I could not achieve until then was the golden glow that shimmers over the deep brown gravy; browning flour in the conventional einbrenne (roux) never yielded that result.

But a generous chef demonstrated the secret: the addition of sugar to the einbrenne. It gilds the gravy even as its sweetness balances the sour lemon note and the zing of pickling spices. —Mimi Sheraton, author of  The German Cookbook (Random House, 1965). Click here for the recipe. German Pot Roast

Germany – Lebkuchen (German Fruit and Spice Cookies)

This rendition of the deeply-spiced German Christmas cookie gets its soft, chewy texture from the addition of honey. Any leftover dough scraps can be re-rolled and cut into additional cookies; remaining candied citrus can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a month.

Read more at Lebkuchen: My Adopted German Tradition. Click here for the recipe.  Lebkuchen

Germany – Bratäpfel mit Walnusseis (Baked Walnut-Stuffed Apples with White Wine)

Apples are roasted in wine and butter for this dessert, a staple of holiday markets throughout Germany. This recipe first appeared in our December 2012 issue along with Todd Coleman’s story Bavarian Dream. Click here for the recipe.  bratapfel mit walnusseis

USA – Pineapple-Chipotle Glazed Ham

Coca Cola is the secret behind perfect smoky-sweet glazed ham. The New York City–based cookbook author Zarela Martinez gave us the recipe for this smoky, Coca-Cola-glazed ham (see “The Wonders of Ham” in SAVEUR‘s December 2009 issue).

To cut slices of fresh pineapple into perfect circles, use a 3″ round cookie cutter to trim the outer edges of the slices and a 1″ round one to cut out the center. Click here for the recipe. Pineapple glazed ham

Sweden – Saffron Buns

The secret to making these mildly sweet pastries—based on a recipe given to us by Gunilla von Heland, a food editor in Stockholm—is to steep the saffron in hot milk before incorporating it. Click here for the recipe. saffron buns

Sweden – Julskinka (Christmas Ham)

This recipe was developed by Marcus Jernmark, chef at Aquavit in New York City, as part of the restaurant’s traditional julbord spread for Christmas. The ham is cooks in an aromatic soup, then glazed and topped with breadcrumbs.

The crucial step is letting the ham come to room temperature while keeping it in its broth. Click here for the recipe. julskinka

England – Decadent Trifle

Drenched in sherry and kirsch, this holiday dessert features layer upon layer of ginger cake, custard, berries, chocolate, and cream. It’s a showstopper. Click here for the recipe. decadent trifle

Norway – Krumkakes (Norwegian Wafer Cookies)

These Norwegian wafer cookies, eaten across Scandinavia during the Christmas season, are light and crisp and perfumed with cardamom. They’re made like waffles on a special griddle that imprints an intricate design, and then they’re rolled and filled with whipped cream. Click here for the recipe.  norwegian wafer cookies

Italy – Roast Leg of Lamb with Potatoes

For this simple Sicilian Easter dish, Cosciotto di Agnello con Patate, a leg of lamb is roasted over a bed of potatoes. This recipe appeared in our March 2011 issue as a part of our special feature, Soul of Sicily. Click here for the recipe. Roast Leg of Lamb

USA – Apricot–Ginger Glazed Ham

A glaze made with apricot and ginger adds a sweet note to salty roasted ham.

This recipe comes from Chris Williams, the chef of Lone Star Barbecue & Mercantile in Santee, South Carolina, and is just one of the delicious ham preparations in Executive Editor Dana Bowen’s December 2009 feature, “The Wonders of Ham.” Click here for the recipe. Apricot Glazed Ham

USA – Roast Turkey with Root Vegetables and Gravy

This recipe involves three steps. First, rub a flavored butter under the turkey’s skin. Then roast the turkey over root vegetables until each piece is done. Finally, make a gravy with the juices left in the roasting pan. Click here for the recipe.  Roast turkey with root vegetables and gravy

Greece – Roasted Lamb with Rosemary (Arni me Dendrolivano)

This technique of roasting lamb over a bed of rosemary sprigs lends this Greek classic a smoky, herbal flavor. Click here for the recipe. Roasted Lamb with rosemary

USA – Fresh Ham with Honey and Cloves

This feastworthy dish, based on a recipe in Pork & Sons by Stéphane Reynaud (Phaidon, 2007), calls for fresh ham, a succulent cut from the pig’s hind leg that yields crisp skin and juicy meat.

If cooking for a larger crowd, roast a whole fresh ham instead of just the shank end, and double the ingredient quantities for the glaze. Click here for the recipe. Ham with honey and cloves

Puerto Rico – Pernil Asado (Roast Pork Shoulder)

We adapted the recipe for lechón, a roasted whole pig, for pork shoulder. This recipe first appeared in our December 2011 issue along with Kathleen Squires’s story Island Holiday. Click here for the recipe. Pernil Asado

Puerto Rico – Pasteles (Green Banana and Pork Tamales)

These flavorful tamales are sold from street stands during the holidays in Puerto Rico. This recipe first appeared in our December 2011 issue along with Kathleen Squires’s story Island Holiday. Click here for the recipe.  pasteles

USA – Herb-Roasted Turkey with Hominy, Oyster, and Sausage Dressing

Rubbing the turkey with olive oil and fresh herbs yields a moist, flavorful bird with crisp skin. An apple cider gravy and a dressing of hominy, sausage, and oysters add richness to the festive Thanksgiving centerpiece.

This recipe first appeared in our November 2012 issue along with Bernard L. Herman’s story A Bountiful Shore. Click here for the recipe. Herb roasted turkey

France – Rosemary-Rubbed Beef Tenderloin

Seasoned with fresh rosemary and garlic, this juicy beef tenderloin is the perfect main dish to serve to big groups; any leftovers can be used in sandwiches the day after. For step-by-step instructions on tying a whole beef tenderloin to ensure even cooking, see All Tied Up.

This recipe first appeared in our October 2011 issue, along with Hunter Lewis‘s article The Boys’ Club. Click here for the recipe. rosemary rubbed beef tenderloin

Caribbean – Crisp Roast Pork

This luscious, Caribbean-inspired preparation for garlicky roast pork works especially well with the cut known as picnic shoulder, which gives you crisper skin than the more popular boston butt.

Some cooks like to remove the skin and cook it separately, but we like the mix of textures that you get when you roast the pork with the skin on. (Besides, the fat layer under the skin continually bastes the meat as it roasts.) Click here for the recipe. crisp roast pork

USA – Rack of Lamb with Rosemary and Thyme

The classic presentation for a roasted rack of lamb calls for frenching the meat—removing the layer of muscle and fat that extends to the end of the rib bones here are step-by-step instructions.
It’s one of the many lamb cooking techniques and recipes featured in “Lamb Around the World,” from SAVEUR’s October 2009 issue. Click here for the recipe.
rack of lamb

England – Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding

A roast served with the savory pastry known as yorkshire pudding—a frequent main course at the University of Cambridge’s Formal Hall—could be called the quintessential British dinner. Click here for the recipe. roast beef with yorkshire pudding

USA – Roasted Veal Breast with Shallot-Caper Stuffing

Veal breast is akin to beef brisket, but while a brisket must be braised to become tender, roasting a veal breast (which comes from a younger animal) renders it juicy and flavorful.

A boneless veal breast is a long and floppy cut, so it’s best to order it “rolled and tied”—this way all you have to do is unroll it to stuff it, and roll it back up the way the butcher did it. Click here for the recipe. roasted veal breast

USA – Roasted Herbed Chicken and Vegetables

This one-dish meal of chicken and vegetables is flavored with lemon peel, garlic, fresh thyme, and butter that has been infused with herbes de provence, a mix of lavender, rosemary, fennel seed, and savory. Click here for the recipe. roasted herb chicken

USA – Crown Roast of Pork with Corn and Apple Stuffing

A crown roast of pork with stuffing mounded in the middle is a dramatic presentation piece—and very easy to carve: Just slice between the ribs and serve one or two chops per person. Click here for the recipe. crown roast pork

France – Duck à l’orange (Duck with orange sauce)

Duck à l’orange is only as French as Catherine de’ Medici, who popularized what was originally a Florentine dish in France. It was first made with bitter oranges, to offset the richness of the duck. This is our take on the classic. Click here for the recipe. roast duck with orange sauce

USA – Squab and Braised Peas

In this dish, the recipe for which is based on one in Game: A Cookbook by Trish Hilferty and Tom Norrington-Davies (Absolute Press, 2009), smoky braised peas pair perfectly with pan-roasted squab. Click here for the recipe. squab and braised peas

USA – Prime Rib

Nowadays, most meat markets sell standing beef rib roasts whose smaller connective bones—called the chine bone and the feather bones—have already been removed (the chine is often tied back on to protect the meat from the oven’s intense heat), which makes the meat easier to carve and produces a more handsome roast.

Some markets will even slice the meat off the rib bones and then tie them back on; we found that the roast came out juicier when the bones were left attached. Either way, be sure the roast is tied at intervals between the rib bones; otherwise the flavorful crust may peel away from the meat during roasting. Click here for the recipe. prime rib

Armenia – Onion- and Saffron-Roasted Lamb

We were introduced to this flavorful lamb dish by Middle Eastern food expert Charles Perry. The sumac that gives the lamb its tang comes from a nontoxic tree fruit—not at all related to poison sumac. Click here for the recipe. onion and saffron roasted lamb

USA – Roast Tenderloin of Beef with Jack Daniel’s Peppercorn Sauce

Veal stock, whiskey, and peppercorns make the perfect sauce for roast beef tenderloin. Click here for the recipe. roast tenderloin of beef with jack daniel's

Russia – Roast Veal with Sour Cherries

This recipe is an adaptation of one in Please to the Table: The Russian Cookbook (Workman Publishing, 1990) by Anya von Bremzen and John Welchman. Don’t use sweet cherries; they’ll make the dish cloying. Click here for the recipe. roast veal with sour cherry

Italy – Prosciutto-Wrapped Roast Pork Loin

Stuffing a butterflied pork loin with herbs and wrapping it with prosciutto keeps the meat juicy and flavorful. Click here for the recipe. prosciutto wrapped roast pork

USA – Steam-Roasted Goose

This unusual recipe, from Julia Child’s The Way to Cook (Random House, 1989), produces a moist goose with crisp skin. Click here for the recipe. steam roasted goose

USA – Roasted Leg of Lamb with Potato-Fennel Gratin

Like many large roasts, the lamb in this dish is cooked in two stages. The first delivers a blast of intense heat to sear the meat; the second slowly roasts it on a bed of potatoes, fennel, and onions. You can save time by making the gratin while searing the lamb. Click here for the recipe. roasted leg of lamb

France – Bûche de Noël (Yule Log Cake with Coffee Buttercream and Ganache)

This version of the traditional French Christmas cake is filled with coffee buttercream and covered in chocolate ganache. See How to Roll and Decorate A Bûche de Noël for illustrated step-by-step instructions. Click here for the recipe.  buche de noel

Children’s Cookbook: Triple F Fake Fast Food & Chicken Spinach Pasta

Triple F” Fake Fast Food

Deborah Goncalves“I came up with this lunch because my grandmother always made this for my mother and taught the recipe to her,” says Deborah.

She likes to serve this with a baby arugula and greens salad with a blue-cheese vinaigrette and watermelon cut up to look like fries. –Deborah Goncalves, age 12, Florida

Ingredients (Makes 6 servings):

2 cups bulgur wheat

1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for greasing

1 medium onion, finely chopped

1/4 cup finely diced red bell pepper

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

2 pounds lean ground beef

1/4 cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Salt and pepper

4 slices melting cheese, such as mozzarella

2 carrots, peeled and grated

2 cups fresh baby spinach, chopped

Preparation:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F and grease an 8-inch-square baking pan with olive oil.
  2. In a medium saucepan, bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Add the bulgur, cover, remove from the heat, and let stand for 15 minutes, then drain in a sieve.
  3. In a small skillet over moderate heat, warm the olive oil. Add the onion, bell pepper, and garlic, and sauté, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 4 minutes. Stir in the cumin and cook 2 more minutes. Let cool.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the ground beef, cooked onion mixture, parsley, and the bulgur. Season with salt and pepper, and mix until you don’t see the difference between the beef and bulgur. Add half of the beef-bulgur mixture to the greased baking pan and press into an even layer. Add the cheese in an even layer on top. Sprinkle the carrot and spinach over the cheese, and season lightly with salt. Crumble the remaining beef-bulgur mixture on top.
  5. Bake the casserole until bubbling and lightly browned on top, about 35 minutes. Let rest for 5 to 10 minutes before you cut.

Chicken Spinach Pasta

Kyle Moore“I was trying to think of something for lunch, and I found these [ingredients] in the fridge and spice cabinets,” says Kyle.

He also recommends serving the pasta with a small fruit salad on the side. Kyle Moore, age 12, Missouri

Ingredients (Make 6 servings):

Whole-Wheat Pizza Crust:

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

¼ cup whole-wheat flour

¾ teaspoon rapid-rise yeast (from a ¼-ounce packet)

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon sugar

½ teaspoon olive oil

¼ cup warm water (105-115°F)

Toppings:

2 tablespoons pizza or tomato sauce

6 fresh spinach leaves

¼ cup sliced leftover grilled chicken breast

¼ cup shredded part-skim mozzarella

4 cherry tomatoes, sliced

2 fresh basil leaves, chopped

Preparation:

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour, yeast, salt, and sugar. Add the oil and warm water, and stir with a wooden spoon to form a sticky ball.
  2. On a lightly floured work surface, knead the dough, dusting with flour as needed, until smooth and elastic, about 4 minutes.
  3. Transfer to a medium bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled, about 25 minutes.
  4. Arrange a rack in the bottom of the oven and preheat to 500°F, or preheat a gas grill.
  5. Stretch dough to about 9 inches, or in whatever shape you want, and place on a lightly oiled baking sheet.
  6. Spoon the tomato sauce on top and, using the back of a spoon and leaving a border of at least ½ inch, spread it over the dough. Top with the spinach, chicken, cheese, and fresh tomato. Cook the pizza on the pan in the oven or on the grill, covered, until the crust is crisp and golden and the cheese is bubbly, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle with fresh basil and serve.

Courtesy: Let’s Move!/Let’s Move!

Meat-less Grill

While “meat” and “grill” generally go hand-in-hand, there’s an underrated world of vegetarian ingredients whose flavors and textures match perfectly with the slow-char effect a grill provides.

With fresh sides like eggplant doused in basil vinaigrette or whole favas with shaved Parmesan, hearty mains like an earthy black bean burger or a blue cheese-topped portobello burger, and even dessert — succulent honey-drizzled peaches — we have all your meat-less grill bases covered for a summer night.

Pasta with Grilled Artichokes

Baby artichokes, dressed with olive oil and garlic, take center stage in this lemony dish. Click here for the recipe. 

Black Bean Burger with Salsa Fresca and Avocado Crema

Cumin, paprika, coriander, and both poblano and chipotle chiles lend their robust flavor to this earthy black bean burger. Dredged in cornmeal, it’s a hearty base for a bright salsa fresca and smooth avocado crema. Click here for the recipe.Meat-Free Grilling-2

Grilled Eggplant with Basil Vinaigrette

Sliced, grilled vegetables served in a simple marinade or vinaigrette are a fixture at many Tuscan meals. Click here for the recipe.Grilled Eggplant with Basil Vinaigrette

Roasted Garlic Chickpea Burger

We took inspiration from falafel when developing these burgers — but unlike the dense, often dry deep-fried chickpea fritters, this sautéed patty is light and rich in texture, with added depth from roasted garlic. Topped with an array of veggies and a sprinkle of feta, it’s a perfect weekend lunch. Click here for the recipe. Meat-Free Grilling-4

Parsley and Onion Salad

Fresh onions add cool spice to this simple parsley salad from Jeremiah Tower Cooks by Jeremiah Tower. Click here for the recipe. Meat-Free Grilling-5

Portobelle Burgers with Blue Cheese and Sautéed Red Onions

A far cry from the standard grilled-mushroom-cap-as-burger, these ultra-savory portobello patties get a further umami boost from garlic and steak sauce — a perfect match for a flavorful topping of melted blue cheese and tangy caramelized red onions. Click here for the recipe. Meat-Free Grilling-6

Quinoa Veggie Burger with Roasted Red Pepper Relish

Our take on a classic meatless burger calls on a slew of vegetables for flavor, color, and texture: carrot, celery, arugula, beans, and — the ingredient that really makes it — quinoa, the high-protein South American grain that has a nutty flavor and toothsome bite.

This veggie burger is infinitely versatile when it comes to toppings, but we particularly like it with a cumin-accented relish of roasted red peppers. Click here for the recipe. Meat-Free Grilling-8

Grilled Polenta

Polenta is a popular dish in Venice, and is often served grilled as a side, though you can also eat it without grilling it, if you like. Click here for the recipe. 

Grilled Peaches with Honey-Almond Streusel

These succulent grilled peaches are topped with almond flour streusel and drizzled with acacia honey, a sweet, unexpected treat for dessert or brunch. Click here for the recipe. 

Grilled Green Onions with Romesco

Traditionally, this recipe calls for Spanish calçots and ñora peppers. Scallions and ancho chiles are good substitutes. Click here for the recipe. 

Grilled Mushrooms

The savory simplicity of mushrooms grilled over hot coals is always a favorite summer flavor. Only a hint of garlic and parsley are needed to season these earthy rich fungi. Click here for the recipe. 

Grilled Whole Favas

Choose tender, bright green pods with beans that feel fresh and pliable through the pod skin for this quick and simple vegetable dish. Click here for the recipe. 

Grilled Vegetable Stacks

We created this summery dish to showcase some of the fresh produce found in the small farms we’ve visited through the years, but you can substitute with the market’s freshest ingredients. Click here for the recipe. 

Courtesy: Saveur

 

Global Cuisine: Edition 7

If you’re currently in an interracial/interethnic relationship, or you are planning on becoming KolorBlind, one of the issues you’ll face in your relationship is the adaptation to different cuisines. This is particularly true, if your significant other is from a different culture/nationality.

Part of being KolorBlind is keeping an open mind to different cultures, looks and languages. Once you can wrap your mind around the fact that you too would be considered ‘different’ or ‘weird’ in their country/culture, I think you’ll begin to accept your partner’s culture a lot more.

One of the first steps to stepping across the line, is learning a new language or in this case acclimating yourself to a new dish. If you and your significant other are not able to agree on whose dish should be prepared, then consider incorporating some of these dishes into your weekly menu.

ASIA

India – Chicken Marsala

Pounding the chicken cutlets before cooking renders them thin and terrifically tender. Deglazing the pan with Marsala and stock after cooking the chicken creates a quick, rich sauce. Click here for the recipe. Chicken Marsala

Korea – Chap Chae (Korean Noodles with Beef and Vegetables)

When I was growing up in Korea, my grandmother would make chap chae for family reunions. Whenever she started stir-frying the shredded beef and vegetables together in a big wok, I would wander into her kitchen, wondering when the party was going to begin.

The finished dish is festive and delicious. I love the combination of slippery sweet potato noodles turned golden from the cooking juices and soy sauce, crunchy vegetables, and tender, juicy beef. For my own family, chap chae is still a sign of celebration: Whenever I make it, my son walks in, asking when the party is starting. —Kyung Up Lim, executive chef of Michael’s in New York CityClick here for the recipe.

China – Hongshao Qiezi (Red-Cooked Eggplant)

When San Francisco finally gained a Shanghainese restaurant in the 1970s, my mother, who was raised in Shanghai, insisted our family try their red-cooked eggplant. I can recall the melting tenderness of the vegetable, colored a dark red from braising in soy sauce and sugar.

Mama never cooked eggplant this way at home, perhaps because my father insisted on eating Cantonese. Years later I learned from my friend Florence Lin how to prepare it. While ground pork or dried shrimp can be added, she favored just Asian eggplant cooked in peanut oil and then braised in soy sauce along with ginger, sugar, and water.

I’ve recently discovered another intriguing take on the recipe, from Danny Bowien of theMission Chinese Food restaurants in San Francisco and New York. Bowien employs ingredients—dill, chiles de àrbol, anchovies—that no Shanghainese home cook would. But the result is just as delicious. —Grace Young, author of Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge (Simon & Schuster, 2010). Click here for the recipe.

EUROPE

FrancePain au Chocolat (Chocolate Croissant)

Everybody in France seems to eat croissants daily, especially pain au chocolat. Some prefer a thin slice of chocolate folded into the dough—me, I like a big bar. No matter how much you put inside, it should be very good quality. —François Payard, pastry chef and owner of FP Patisserie. Click here for the recipe. 
Pain au Chocolate

Spain – Pescao en Escabeche (Maricel E. Presilla’s Fish with Escabeche Sauce)

The cooks of Islamic Spain, or Al-Andalus, like the Romans before them, had a penchant for using vinegar-and-olive oil pickling sauces, or escabeches, to flavor and preserve everything from fish to vegetables. The technique survived the demise of Al-Andalus in Spain, as well as in many former Spanish colonies.

In my native Cuba, escabeche was synonymous with sierra (sawfish), much appreciated for its firm, white flesh. You could go to any cafeteria or restaurant and always find on the countertop a large earthenware cazuela filled with fried sawfish steaks topped with an olive oil-and-vinegar pickling sauce. Cuban escabeches often resemble contemporary Iberian models, simply seasoned with garlic, sliced yellow onion and bell pepper, and some bay leaf.

Because escabeches start with a sofrito, the iconic Spanish and Latin American flavor base subject to infinite permutations, it is not surprising to see that escabeches, too, vary tremendously across Latin America. But vinegar and olive oil remain the backbone of this singular, ocean-spanning technique. —Maricel E. Presilla, author of Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America (W.W. Norton & Company, 2012).  Click here for the recipe.Pescao en Escabeche Fish with Escabeche Sauce

Greece – Moussaka

A good moussaka—a baked casserole of eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes, and minced lamb or beef under a lush layer of béchamel sauce—is one of the most fabulous things you can eat. And it takes time. In Greece, when we think of this dish, we remember our mothers and grandmothers, who often labored for hours to prepare it.

(I learned to make moussaka from my own well-organized mother, who often started the preparations the day before, frying the eggplants, preparing the meat and tomato sauce, then assembling the dish the day it was to be served.) But for a dish with such a strong grip on our memories, moussaka as we know it in Greece today has a short history: Though a similar casserole had existed previously, the added layer of Frenchified béchamel was popularized by the chef and cookbook author Nicholas Tselementes in the late 1920s.

Now, I have a hard time with Tselementes. He was an admirer of French cooking, reworking Greek recipes to fit his idea of classical cuisine, and his influence nearly wiped out traditional Greek cooking for generations. But every time I taste moussaka, with its perfect balance of flavors, I think it’s his atonement: Perhaps moussaka makes up for the rest. —Aglaia Kremezi, author of Mediterranean Hot and Spicy (Clarkson Potter, 2009). Click here for the recipe. Moussaka

Germany – German Pot Roast

It was in Cologne in 1963 that I finally solved the riddle of preparing sauerbraten. What I could not achieve until then was the golden glow that shimmers over the deep brown gravy; browning flour in the conventional einbrenne (roux) never yielded that result.

But a generous chef demonstrated the secret: the addition of sugar to the einbrenne. It gilds the gravy even as its sweetness balances the sour lemon note and the zing of pickling spices. —Mimi Sheraton, author of  The German Cookbook (Random House, 1965). Click here for the recipe.

German Pot Roast

CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICA

Central/South America – Iraü Lau Juyeirugu (Seafood Soup)

Fresh basil, oregano, and sage lend their fragrance to this hearty soup, loaded with five different types of seafood. This recipe first appeared in our November 2012 issue along with Betsy Andrews’s story Cassava Nation. Click here to view the recipe. Irau Seafood Soup

Chicken with Rice

This simple dish is a staple of home cooking throughout Spain and Latin America.This version is mild, comforting, and brothy, almost to the point of being a soup. Click here to view the recipe. chicken with rice

NORTH AMERICA

USA – Shrimp and Oyster Perloo

One-pot rice dishes can be remarkably adaptable and easy to cook. Our favorite is perloo, from the Lowcountry of South Carolina, a cousin of jambalaya that traces its origins to the family of Middle Eastern dishes known as pilafs.

Like other rice-based specialties, such as arroz con pollo and biriyani, perloo can be made with a wide range of ingredients; in this case, we use country ham and shrimp. Click here to view the recipe. shrimp and oyster perloo

USA – Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

During cooking, okra exudes a thick liquid that gives this hearty Cajun stew a sumptuous, silky texture; a little filé powder, made from dried sassafras leaves, further thickens and enriches it.

But the backbone of this gumbo, and the source of its smoky flavor, is the roux made by toasting flour in hot oil until it is a deep red-brown. Click here for the recipe.Chicken and sausage gumbo

CARIBBEAN

Holiday Sweet Bread

This is an adaptation of a Caribbean cook’s generations-old family recipe. Click here to view the recipe. holiday sweet bread

Twice-Fried Green Plantains with Garlic Dipping Sauce

You can flatten the tostones between two pieces of plantain skin, but the bottom of a small pan or a flat pot lid will work, too. Click here for the recipe. green plantain with garlic dipping sauce

AFRICA

Tunisia – Casse-Croûte Tunisien (Tunisan Tuna Sandwich)

Both hands are needed to eat this overstuffed tuna sandwich, lavished with fiery condiments and stacks of fixings, a North African take on a French pan bagnat. This recipe first appeared in our November 2012 issue along with Jay Cheshes’s story Couscous Royale. Click here for the recipe. Tunisa Tuna Sandwich

Egypt – Falafel

I have eaten my share of falafel around the world, and I love the way the simple legume patty takes on the flavor of a place, as in the dense fava bean falafels of Egypt and Iraq, Palestine’s parsley-heavy chickpea versions, and the unusual falafel I happened upon at a restaurant called Amon, on Via Palazzuolo in Florence, where the Egyptian chef Na’ama adds fresh fennel to her mash.

But any way you make it, there is nothing like falafel’s first bite: the crisp-fried exterior giving way to a creamy center of seasoned mashed beans, garlic, and parsley. —Felicia Campbell. Click here to for the recipe.

Until the next time we explore food from around the world, eat, pray and love.